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Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2008

Simon Grinbaud is the second son of a Jewish family from Poland who settled in France before the war. Unlike his family, Simon managed to escape the Paris police roundups. He was, however, arrested in the police roundup of August 26, 1942 in the southern zone, where he had met up with his brother Henri. They were both deported in the Convoy N°32, September 14, 1942.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2008

Born of Jewish parents in March 1940, Alain-André Bernstein was hidden with a Catholic family in the Loire Valley, just ten days after his birth. Thanks to the correspondence kept by his mother and rediscovered when she died, he was able to reconstitute the story of his earliest childhood. The letters of his foster family express the love and all the attention given to the child just awakening to life, in a world where he was risking death by the mere fact of being born a Jew.

Editions Nathan, 2007

This anthology, destined for a general readership, brings together fundamental texts, selected by several specialists, which evoke the richness and diversity of a rich culture that goes back several thousand years.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2007

This book is a new edition of the account published by Julien Unger at the end of World War II. Written shortly after the events they describe, the work is remarkable for its precision. Julien Unger narrates his experience as a French Jewish deportee and the conditions in which he survived at Auschwitz-Birkenau and other Nazi concentration camps.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2007 (2e édition en 2010)

"This work constitutes my eyewitness account of the Shoah. It denounces the extreme cruelty of the events I lived through during the World War II in Poland. I tell of the harsh conditions for survival that I experienced inside and outside the ghettos, as well as my life as a child in hiding".

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2007

Based on the letters left by their parents, André-Lilian and Réjane Mossé retrace the path trodden by their mother, Francine, and father, Christian, murdered by the Nazis because of their Jewish origins. The Mossé family was originally from Angoulins-sur-Mer, western France, who, following the defeat of 1940 found themselves in the forbidden coastal area. Living in Paris, Francine and Christian took refuge in Marseille with their children. The visit of Francine at Angoulins in a zone under high surveillance rendered the whole family suspect of espionage.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2007

Eliezer Lewinsohn (known as Robby) was born in 1927 in Berlin. In 1933, his mother and he fled from Germany and took refuge in Lyon. Pursuing her charity work, his mother headed a reception centre for Jewish refugees. Robby learned to work the earth - and Judaism - at the Taluyers farm-school. As the hunting of dozens of Jews grew more intense, he shared in his mother’s activities and took an active part in the Jewish Resistance.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2007

The Shoah brushed against Tunisia. The Jews there were persecuted, but the Nazis were not able to inflict on Tunisian Jewry the special treatment reserved for the Jewish populations which fell under their domination. Robert Borgel, a barrister in Tunis, and his father Moïse, president of the town’s Jewish community, were major players in this drama. Robert Borgel describes here in especially lively detail how the community leaders managed to save their fellow Jewish citizens detained by the worst of criminals.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2007

This work presents eight texts about the camp "C" or "Jewish camp" of Royallieu, a suburb of Compiègne 75 km north of Paris. Thanks to this previous unpublished volume, the reader can complete his understanding of the terrible internment conditions of Jews in his camp for Nazi retaliations, under the auspices of the German Army.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2007

This book tells the tragic story of Adèle Grossman, a young Polish Jew from the region of Lodz. Having lost most of her family, she found herself alone in Auschwitz, in Birkenau and then in the Stutthof camp. Left for dead at the time of the evacuation, she had to undergo amputation of both her legs, frozen during the "death march". Despite all her physical suffering, despite the unspeakable pain of losing her close relatives, Adèle maintained an inner strength to the continue to live and to found a family.