Menu Rechercher
January 2005

The Auschwitz Album, published jointly by the Foundation and the publishing house Editions Al Dante, consists of a collection of almost 200 photographs, taken by members of the SS in May and June 1944, during the massive deportation of Hungarian Jews to Birkenau.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2005

For his son’s 16th birthday of, Claude Zlotzisty felt the need to tell him what he lived through at his age. As a survivor of Auschwitz and two "death marches", he describes in this book how he survived with his father the anti-Semitic persecutions and the Nazi rage, this torrent of hate which deprived him of his mother and deeply traumatized his sister. 

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2005 (édition augmentée)

Born into a Jewish family emigrated from Poland, Albert Bigielman was a little Paris scamp whose childhood was turned upside down by the war. After joining the Foreign Legion, his father was captured. Albert stayed with his mother and kid brother in Menilmontant. On February 4, 1944, he was rounded up with his mother and interned in the camp at Drancy for three months. Both of them were deported with the status of hostages to the camp at Bergen-Belsen.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2005

Claude Hirsch was born 1931 into an Alsatian Jewish family; Fleeing persecution, the Hirsches were arrested in Lyon by the French militia. They were transferred to Drancy, then deported June 30,1944 to Auschwitz-Birkenau. On getting off the train, Claude’s mother had the presence of mind to lie about the age of her son. That saved his life. Claude was assigned to forced labour in the Auschwitz III-Monowitz camp.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2005

François Lecomte was born in 1929 in Paris, with the name of Lévy. The war and the Occupation turned his childhood upside down. The persecutions and omnipresent danger led his parents to part with their son. François. François was sent into hiding in Chambon-sur-Lignon in southern France.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2005

Salomon Malmed was born in 1935 in Saint-Quentin in the Aisne department, of parents recently immigrated from East Europe. He was still very young when his father died. From 1940, his mother entrusted him to the French Jewish Organisation to Save the Children - OSE (Œuvre de secours aux enfants) which arranged his shelter from anti-Semitic persecutions.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2005

Mireille Boccara discovered anti-Semitism before she was seven, in her school playground in Lyon. Six years later came defeat in war, the Occupation of France by the Germans and soon after, the hunting down of Jews. Mireille’s father, Elie Lalou, an eminent citizen awarded the Légion d’Honneur, put his trust in Marshal Pétain and the laws of his country. Despite the alarm signals, he could not believe that the life of his family was threatened.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2005 - 2 volumes

Benjamin Schatzman was arrested December 12, 1941 during the "police roundup of eminent citizens" aimed at the bourgeoisie and the intellectual élite in the Paris area. Interned in the camp at Compiègne, he managed to keep a diary despite the material difficulties. He describes his daily torture in a remarkablel anguage and noble attitude.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2005

When he wrote letters to his wife, Jacques Salon (1914- 1989) did not know that she would not return from deportation. Nicole was a social worker at the OSE when he met her in 1940. For over two years, they were in the Resistance together, saving more than 200 Jewish children. October 24, 1943 - just three months after their marriage - Nicole was arrested, then deported to Auschwitz.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2005

In 1945, at the liberation of the camp at Buchenwald, more than a thousand young Jews aged from 8 to 24 were waiting for their fate to be decided. The French Jewish Organisation to Save the Children - OSE (Œuvre de secours aux enfants) took charge of 426 boys originating from Central and Eastern Europe. This book brings together the accounts of 15 survivors from Buchenwald who have accepted to share their memories.