Menu Rechercher
Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2011

Nicolas Roth was one of the 440,000 Jews who were deported in 1944 from Hungary in just two months. He gives us here a richly detailed account of the fate of the Jewish community of Debrecen. After the German invasion in 1944, the Jews were confined to ghettos and then transported en masse to the death-camps. Deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau, Nicolas Roth managed to survive despite the harsh work to which he was subjected.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2011

Andrée Salomon (1908-1985) was one of the great figures in the Jewish Resistance in France. She was responsible for social welfare in the OSE. She organized the saving of children from the internment camps in the southern zone, who were placed in the houses of the OSE, then kept in hiding with false identities to enable them to evade deportation.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2010

If the death camp of Treblinka is now sadly famous, the labour camp which preceded it (Treblinka I) is much less known. Mieczyslaw Chodzko’s story is one of the rare eyewitness accounts about that camp. Mieczyslaw Chodzko was born in Lodz in 1930. Rounded up in the Falenica ghetto, he was deported to Treblinka and transferred on arrival to the labour camp.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2010

In September 1940, Eva Golgevit joined the Solidarity group, Jewish section of the Communist resistance movement MOI (Main-d’Oeuvre Immigrée). She was arrested, imprisoned and deported, like the majority of her network, in Convoy N°58, July 31, 1943. On arrival at Auschwitz, she was interned in Block 10, reserved for "medical experiments".

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2010

Charles Mitzer was a young soldier at the time of the French defeat in 1940. Returning to civilian life, he worked in Grenoble as a radio-electrician and put his skills at the disposition of the Resistance. After the German invasion of the Occupation zone administered by the Italians, he was arrested in February 1944 when he was on his way to join the underground and bring his woman companion to safety. Charles and his young brother were deported in Convoy N°69.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2010

Fleeing the Parisian region during the exodus, the Goltman family found refuge in the Allier department of central France. There Pierre and his father were denounced and arrested as accomplices of the local Resistance. It was as Jews that they were transferred to the camp of Drancy, then deported in the convoy of June 30, 1944.

Norton & Company - 2010

En 1972, la cour de justice de Hambourg acquitte Walter Becker, le lavant de l’accusation de crimes de guerre commis à l'encontre de la population juive du ghetto de Wierzbnik alors qu'il était chef de la police criminelle. Christopher R. Browning se penche alors sur les récits des survivants et les interrogatoires réalisés en vue du procès. Il s’attache à un objet historique relativement peu étudié pour lui-même faute de documentation, le camp-usine de travail forcé.

<p>The discovery of more than 1,500 prized paintings and drawings in a private Munich residence, as well as a recent movie about Allied attempts to recover European works of art, have brought Nazi plundering back into the headlines, but the thievery was far from being limited to works of art. From 1942 onwards, ordinary Parisian Jews - mostly poor families and recent immigrants from Eastern Europe - were robbed, not of sculptures or paintings, but of toys, saucepans, furniture, and sheets.</p>

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2009

Fanny et David Sauleman ont beaucoup en commun. Vivant dans le même quartier de Paris, ils sont issus d’une même culture séfarade. Ils sont tous deux imprégnés de la langue judéo-espagnole de leurs ancêtres turcs et saloniciens. Enfants pendant la guerre, ils parviennent à échapper à la barbarie nazie. Ils partageront par la suite le souvenir des persécutions et le traumatisme de la disparition de leurs proches.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2009

Coming from a Czech Jewish family, Otto Gerard Fischl was a teenager when he began to write his diary in 1938. At 13, he went into hiding with his brother and his parents in the home of the Stacke family in Charente. His "captivity" lasted more than two years. To combat his boredom and the anguish of being denounced, Otto confided to his diary the tumultuous life of the household, but also his extensive reading, news of the war and his reflections which often became philosophical.