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Testimonies by hidden children

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2012

This work presents the effort of a man to ensure that tribute be paid to the memory of those who gave a reprieve on life to the child he was and to his family, saving them from the death programmed for all Jews by the Nazis. Jean Henrion, with lucidity and intelligence, presents the fruit of seven years of research which led to distinguishing four "Righteous among the Nations": Pierre Fouchier, Jacques Ellul, Hélène Schweitzer (Rosenberg) and Edith Cerezuelle.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2009

Fanny et David Sauleman ont beaucoup en commun. Vivant dans le même quartier de Paris, ils sont issus d’une même culture séfarade. Ils sont tous deux imprégnés de la langue judéo-espagnole de leurs ancêtres turcs et saloniciens. Enfants pendant la guerre, ils parviennent à échapper à la barbarie nazie. Ils partageront par la suite le souvenir des persécutions et le traumatisme de la disparition de leurs proches.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2009

Coming from a Czech Jewish family, Otto Gerard Fischl was a teenager when he began to write his diary in 1938. At 13, he went into hiding with his brother and his parents in the home of the Stacke family in Charente. His "captivity" lasted more than two years. To combat his boredom and the anguish of being denounced, Otto confided to his diary the tumultuous life of the household, but also his extensive reading, news of the war and his reflections which often became philosophical.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2008

Pierre Auer Bacher was originally from Wissembourg in northern Alsace. From the outbreak of war, the border population was evacuated to the south-west of France. Pierre was ten. He discovered Paris occupied by the Nazis, crossed the demarcation line into the "free" zone with his mother and grandparents and was reunited with his father, demobilized from the French Army at Limoges.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2008

Born of Jewish parents in March 1940, Alain-André Bernstein was hidden with a Catholic family in the Loire Valley, just ten days after his birth. Thanks to the correspondence kept by his mother and rediscovered when she died, he was able to reconstitute the story of his earliest childhood. The letters of his foster family express the love and all the attention given to the child just awakening to life, in a world where he was risking death by the mere fact of being born a Jew.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2007 (2e édition en 2010)

"This work constitutes my eyewitness account of the Shoah. It denounces the extreme cruelty of the events I lived through during the World War II in Poland. I tell of the harsh conditions for survival that I experienced inside and outside the ghettos, as well as my life as a child in hiding".

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2007

Based on the letters left by their parents, André-Lilian and Réjane Mossé retrace the path trodden by their mother, Francine, and father, Christian, murdered by the Nazis because of their Jewish origins. The Mossé family was originally from Angoulins-sur-Mer, western France, who, following the defeat of 1940 found themselves in the forbidden coastal area. Living in Paris, Francine and Christian took refuge in Marseille with their children. The visit of Francine at Angoulins in a zone under high surveillance rendered the whole family suspect of espionage.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2007

Eliezer Lewinsohn (known as Robby) was born in 1927 in Berlin. In 1933, his mother and he fled from Germany and took refuge in Lyon. Pursuing her charity work, his mother headed a reception centre for Jewish refugees. Robby learned to work the earth - and Judaism - at the Taluyers farm-school. As the hunting of dozens of Jews grew more intense, he shared in his mother’s activities and took an active part in the Jewish Resistance.

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2006

Thérèse Malachy-Krol describes in this book her childhood in Poland. To begin with, in Lodz, where she was born into a wellto- do religious Jewish milieu, then in Warsaw. She is one of rare survivors still able to bear witness to what she experienced in that town, symbol of the mass extermination of Jews, but also of their heroic revolt. 

Éditions Le Manuscrit / Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah - 2005

François Lecomte was born in 1929 in Paris, with the name of Lévy. The war and the Occupation turned his childhood upside down. The persecutions and omnipresent danger led his parents to part with their son. François. François was sent into hiding in Chambon-sur-Lignon in southern France.